Marginalia

Odd scraps, bits and pieces, notes from other blogs and other stuff.


Ask me anything  
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Who do I follow on Twitter?

Who do I follow on Twitter?

  1. People I’ve met face to face
  2. People I haven’t met but who are related to me
  3. People who interact with me online, on blogs, mailing lists, newsgroups etc
  4. People who say interesting stuff or post interesting links, even if I don’t know them
The same applies, mutatis mutandis, to people I “friend” on Facebook. Most of what I post on Twitter is links to stuff I’ve written elsewhere, or links to other stuff I find interesting. I don’t see Twitter as a medium for discussion. I also don’t see it as a medium for posting photos (I use Facebook for that). If people post lots of photos on Twitter, I usually stop following them. I don’t ask people to follow me on Twitter (or Facebook, for that matter), but I don’t mind if they do. Just don’t expect me to follow you back, unless you interact in other ways, like through a mailing list or newsgroup, or comments on a blog (yours or mine) or getting together for coffee or something if we are close enough. I say this because I have a lot of “friend” requests on Facebook from people I don’t know, and I’m not sure how to respond to them, so I usually don’t, and I thought I should perhaps explain why I don’t.
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It is, literally, the year of C. S. Lewis. Fifty years since his death, on Nov. 22, 1963 — yes, he died the same day as Kennedy and Aldous Huxley — he is more influential than ever. As Publishers Weekly notes, “While Huxley is now largely forgotten and Kennedy remains a symbol of lost promise, Lewis lives on through his novels, stories, essays, and autobiographical works.” His books are selling more than 6 million copies a year, new special editions of “The Screwtape Letters” and “A Grief Observed” are due out this year, and this November, he will join Shakespeare, T. S. Eliot and Chaucer as writers buried or commemorated in Westminster Abbey’s Poets Corner. Greg Garrett: C. S. Lewis, 50 Years On
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In the DA’s existing heartland, the term “affirmative action” triggers thoughts of entitlement and incompetence. In its prospective heartland, the one it imagines and wishes for, the words “entitlement” and “incompetence” signal the smugness and stupidity of those who cannot understand. These two constituencies inhabit the same world, but they live on different planets. The DA’s challenge is to speak to the souls of both at the same time, to allay the fears of one while kindling the hopes of the other. If the DA fails, the precariously middle class will fall back on a love-hate relationship with the ANC. They will despise it for its corruption and its pomp. But they will love it because it understands. Zille, Leon have yet to show they understand | Columnists | BDlive
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while trans fat reliably extends the shelf life of foods, it clearly shortens the shelf life of people eating those foods – and more so than saturated fat ever did. Trans Fats: the Latest Misstep in Modern Nutrition - Eat Run (usnews.com)